Tuesday, August 29, 2017

How to Talk So Kids Can Learn - Reading Together - Praise That Doesn’t Demean, Criticism That Doesn’t Wound


HELPFUL PRAISE/CONSTRUCTIVE RESPONSES
At Home and in School

Instead of evaluating, you can:

1. DESCRIBE WHAT YOU SEE OR HEAR.
"You caught the ‘chug-a-chug’ rhythm of a train and you found a way to rhyme ‘track’ with ‘clickity clack.’"

2. DESCRIBE WHAT YOU FEEL.
"It makes me feel as if I’m sitting inside a railroad car speeding through the countryside."

Instead of criticizing, you can:

3. POINT OUT WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE.
"All this poem needs now is the correct spelling of the words ‘caboose’ and ‘freight’ and it’s ready for the bulletin board."

(locations 1799-1812, Kindle Edition)

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Monday, August 28, 2017

Music Sale!


I am selling some of my piano books.
All the books listed below are either brand new or gently used.
Please check the list below for the most up-to-date list of what I have on hand.

Any questions or orders, please email me: pianolessonsmn at gmail dot com

Alfred's Basic Piano Library - Repertoire Book Level 2 - 2.00 USD

Alfred's Basic Piano Library - Musical Concepts Level 2 - 2.00 USD

Teaching Little Fingers to Play Recital Pieces - 2.00 USD


Scott Joplin Piano Rags - 5.00 USD

Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring - 2.00 USD

The Parade Book - 2.00 USD

Classical Folk by Phillip Keveren - 6.00 USD


Famous Hymns - 2.00 USD


Wildflowers - 2.00 USD

Shipping to the USA: 3.00 USD for first item, additional 0.50 USD for every additional item

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Tuesday, August 22, 2017

How to Talk So Kids Can Learn - Reading Together - Solving Problems Together


PROBLEM SOLVING
At Home and in School

1. LISTEN TO THE CHILD’S FEELINGS AND NEEDS.
Adult:  You seem very upset about failing your Spanish test.
Child:  I am! I only got twelve words right out of twenty, and I studied for an hour last night!

2. SUMMARIZE THE CHILD’S POINT OF VIEW.
Adult:  You sound pretty discouraged. Even though you tried to cram all those new words into your head, some of them refused to stick.

3. EXPRESS YOUR FEELINGS AND NEEDS.
Adult:  My concern is that if you don’t memorize the basic vocabulary, you’ll get further and further behind.

4. INVITE THE CHILD TO BRAINSTORM WITH YOU.
Adult:  I wonder, if we put our heads together, could we come up with some new and more effective ways to study?

5. WRITE DOWN ALL IDEAS—WITHOUT EVALUATING.
Child: Drop Spanish.
Adult:  (writing): I’ve got that. What else?
Child: Maybe I could …

6. TOGETHER DECIDE WHICH IDEAS YOU DON’T LIKE, WHICH YOU DO, AND HOW YOU PLAN TO PUT THEM INTO ACTION.
Adult:  What do you think of the idea of making flash cards and studying only four new words each night?
Child:  That’s okay. But instead of flash cards, I like the idea of saying my words into a tape recorder and testing myself until I know them.

(locations 1420-1438, Kindle Edition)

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Monday, August 21, 2017

Giveaway: Monster Piano Stickers

Time for another giveaway!

Crosby Audio recently launched their Monster Piano Stickers on Amazon and I’ve teamed up with them to give away one set to my readers.

 




Prize: 1 Set of Monster Piano Stickers.

Monster Piano Stickers may look silly, but they're serious about making it easy for kids and adult beginners to learn how to play piano or keyboard. The fun, vibrant design will delight players of all ages and they’ll never outgrow the stickers simply by removing the monster letters and leaving behind just the notes as they progress.

Easy to follow instructions for sticker placement included and there's no sticky residue or adhesive left behind when the stickers are removed.

Sheet 1 stickers measure 18mm x 25mm (0.71" x 0.98"). Sheet 2 & 3 stickers measure 10mm x 70mm (0.39" x 2.76").

Stickers fit most pianos, digital pianos and electric keyboards including:
• Alesis
• Alizzee
• Casio
• Hamzer
• Korg
• Plixio
• RockJam
• Yamaha

Enter between August 21, 2017 and August 28, 2017 (11:59pm CST)

Winner will be announced on August 29, 2017 and emailed for confirmation. Winner must respond to winning email within 72 hours or new winner will be selected.

Winner must claim delivery of prize within 3 months.

Open only to readers located in the U.S. and Canada.

Winner chosen randomly. No purchase necessary.

To enter, comment below. Only one entry per person.

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Tuesday, August 15, 2017

How to Talk So Kids Can Learn - Reading Together - The Pitfalls of Punishment: Alternatives That Lead to Self-Discipline


ALTERNATIVES TO PUNISHMENT
At Home and in School

Instead of threatening punishment, you can:

1. POINT OUT A WAY TO BE HELPFUL.
“I hear your frustration. It would be helpful if you could express it without cursing.”

2. EXPRESS YOUR STRONG DISAPPROVAL (WITHOUT ATTACKING CHARACTER).
“That kind of language upsets me.”

3. STATE YOUR EXPECTATIONS.
“I expect you to find some other way to let me know how angry you are.”

4. SHOW THE CHILD HOW TO MAKE AMENDS.
“What I’d like to see is a list of some strong words you could use instead of the ones you just did. Try the dictionary or thesaurus if you need help.”

5. OFFER A CHOICE.
“You can curse to yourself—in your head—or you can use words that won’t offend anyone.” (And if the child continues to use obscenities?)

6. LET THE CHILD EXPERIENCE THE CONSEQUENCES OF HIS BEHAVIOR.
“When I hear those words, I lose all desire to help you—with math or anything else.”

(locations 1059-1075, Kindle Edition)

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Tuesday, August 8, 2017

How to Talk So Kids Can Learn - Reading Together - Seven Skills That Invite Kids to Cooperate


ENGAGING COOPERATION
At Home and in School

Instead of questioning and criticizing, you can:

1. DESCRIBE THE PROBLEM.
“I see wet paint all over the floor.”

2. GIVE INFORMATION.
“It’s easier to remove paint before it dries.”

3. OFFER A CHOICE.
“You can clean it up with a wet rag or a damp sponge.”

4. SAY IT WITH A WORD OR GESTURE.
“The paint!”

5. DESCRIBE WHAT YOU FEEL.
“I don’t like seeing the floor splattered with paint.”

6. PUT IT IN WRITING.
ATTENTION ALL ARTISTS: Kindly restore floor to original condition before leaving the room. Thank you, The Management

7. BE PLAYFUL (USE ANOTHER VOICE OR ACCENT).
In country-and-western style sing: Ah see paint thar on the floor, An’ it’s a sight ah do deplore. Git out your mop an’ rags galore, An’ help to do this little chore.

(locations 742-759, Kindle Edition)

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Tuesday, August 1, 2017

How to Talk So Kids Can Learn - Reading Together - How to Deal with Feelings That Interfere with Learning

I've really been enjoying this book and have found it quite helpful so far. I've decided to post the summaries located towards the end of each chapter, because they will help me to remember the main points.

CHILDREN NEED TO HAVE THEIR FEELINGS ACKNOWLEDGED
At Home and in School

Instead of dismissing the child’s feelings, you can:

1. IDENTIFY THE CHILD’S FEELINGS.
“You sound very disappointed. It can be upsetting when you know the answer and lose points for careless mistakes.”

2. ACKNOWLEDGE THE CHILD’S FEELINGS WITH A SOUND OR WORD.
“Oh” or “Mmm” or “Uh” or “I see.”

3. GIVE THE CHILD IN FANTASY WHAT YOU CAN’T GIVE HIM IN REALITY.
“Wouldn’t it be great if you had a magic pencil that would stop writing if you were about to make a mistake!”

4. ACCEPT THE CHILD’S FEELINGS EVEN AS YOU STOP UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOR.
“You’re still so angry about that grade, you’re kicking your desk! I can’t allow that. But you can tell me more about what’s upsetting you. Or you can draw it.”

(locations 330-343, Kindle Edition)

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